DC's

The blog of author Dennis Cooper

Unbuilt

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Canadian entrepreneur Michael Henderson thought of an out-of-this-world idea in 2002. He envisioned a 250-acre resort on the Vegas Strip complete with a lunar-themed aquatic center, a mall, a biosphere and even moon buggy rides. Other ideas included a crater pool with water slides, a glass underwater walking area, rock climbing wall, a bar with a two-story waterfall, a winter sports-themed area and a vineyard. To be called Moon World Resort, it would have featured 10,000 rooms and cost $5 billion dollars.

 

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COOP HIMMELB(L)AU’S Sky-Arc / Sci-Arc – 24 hour Living, Culture and Arts District (Los Angeles)

 

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In the mid-imperialist flush of the 1800s, a Londoner named Thomas Wilson decided it was about time the city had its very own Egyptian-style pyramid mausoleum, perched atop Primrose Hill (the highest point in the city). It was to be “sufficiently capacious to receive 5,000,000 of the dead”.

 

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In 2004, artist Thomas Hirschhorn was invited to create an “enterable” project in Minneapolis as part of Walker without Walls, the series of programs we presented around town during construction of our new facility. He came up with a Road Side Giant of his own — a 50-foot tall replica of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s book A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. The massive tome was to be installed along Lake Street in south Minneapolis and would’ve housed a library of philosophy texts, the production center for a daily philosophy newspaper he and philosopher Marcus Steinweg were to create, a meeting and exhibition space, and, outside, a cafe. The project unfortunately outgrew its budget and was never realized.


 

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The first Apple Phone was conceived and got as far as the prototype stage in 1983. Before the Macintosh. The Apple Phone had a graphical user interface with a touchscreen. It also had a built-in checkbook program that was intended to allow users to use an early form of online checking. It had an address book as well, which would allow users to scroll through a phone list, click with the stylus, and place a phone call.

 

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The Angel City Development Project was designed as an entertainment complex and landmark attraction for the public and visiting tourists of the downtown Los Angeles area. As Brett’s vision the project would incorporate shopping centers, cinemas, museums, hotels, lush gardens, and various showcases. The tower and its surrounding buildings were designed to stand on a 122 acre site which Brett and his City of Angel’s corporation collected and acquired over the course of 2 years. The unique architecture of Angel City incorporates monumental concrete, granite, and stainless steel flying buttresses inspired by great historic European gothic cathedrals. These elements are merged with an original modern structure making it the first of its kind in the world and a uniquely original creation. Due to an eminent domain lawsuit filed by the Los Angeles School Board, the project’s land is no longer available to construct the grand Angel City development.







 

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In 2016 developer Dacra unsuccessfully proposed a small retail building at 4039 NE 42st Avenue, Miami, designed by Chad Oppenheim. It was called Stardust East.

 

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These are the only known photos of these unproduced prototypes for toys that were never released.


 

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Port Disney (Long Beach, CA)


 

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Steven Holl, an American architect, first proposed the idea of a bike lane between two skyscrapers at the mouth of one of Copenhagen’s harbors in 2008. After much discussion among city planners and architects, the project was finally cancelled in 2015.

 

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It’s 1967. Desmond Plummer and the GLC’s abandoned plan for a monorail on Regent Street. It was just going to go overhead. It looks kind of very stylized to that era, but it says a lot that space was prime real estate. They wanted to hang on to as much pavement space as possible. They didn’t want to extend the roads. They wanted to build there, so they thought let’s just cram in as much as we can. Let’s have a monorail, let’s take things above.

 

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Luckman and Alexander’s star-shaped Hollywood Museum atop Griffith Park (Lo Angeles)

 

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1951 Buick Le Sabre

 

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In 2008, Zaha Hadid won an international competition for the proposed art museum, Vilnius Guggenheim Hermitage Museum, in Lithuania’s capital Vilnius. Hadid’s proposal was a “mystical object, hovering over spindled artificial landscape strip” that contrasted with the verticality of surrounding skyscrapers. The museum was initially scheduled to open in 2011, however was terminated due to allegations of corruption.

 

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Phare du Monde was due to be an observation tower at Paris’s 1937 World Fair (tagline: “Pleasure Tower Half Mile High”). It would have been half a mile high, with a restaurant, sun lounge and beacon at the top, and a bizarre spiral road channelling cars up to a parking garage at the top of the tower.

 

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Western Rivers Expedition, intended for Florida’s Walt Disney World, was going to be Frontierland’s version of Pirates of the Caribbean.




 

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Resembling the nest of an insect, the Dystopian Farming project by Eric Vergne, proposed to built along the Skyline Park in Manhattan would have combined farms, worker housing and market places, mixing politically opposing classes – farmers and urban consumers.

 

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Rome Central Train Station

 

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In 1999, Pepsi and George Lucas decided to get together and release some Star Wars themed items together. Unfortunately, the deal fell through. Years later, a few pieces of concept art were leaked out.

 

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9/11 Memorial designed by Jonathan Cape: “All…victims…are represented by an array of wires…connected to the bedrock of the site and at the other end to a series of steel columns. These wires will also attach to a grass ground plane floating at street level. The wires will express a degree of tension by deforming these columns into a wide variety of forms…and by pulling the ground plane into a variety of folds. Placed between each column are a series of fabric veils which will billow in the winds…and are a metaphoric expression of the souls of the victims. The columns will peel away from a large glass plane upon which are inscribed the place and dates of various atrocities that have occurred in the last century; the wires and veils will be symbolically using the deaths of the victims as a means of exposing other atrocities and will remember the countless unidentified victims of past events in our shared global community.”

 

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The Threatening Shadow. Designed for the New York World’s Fair, 1939.

 

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Victor Gruen, the architect best-known as the inventor of the modern shopping mall, almost built a giant housing development on what is currently called Roosevelt Island. The project would have comprised a 22 ft tall, two-level platform with a series of 8 to 50-story apartment towers. Responding to mass housing shortages, the project would have accommodated up to 70,000 people.

 

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The Dragonfly was an urban farm concept for New York City’s Roosevelt Island, modeled after the wings of a dragonfly and designed to provide fresh, local food within an urban environment. Fruit, vegetables, grains, meat and dairy would have been produced on the Dragonfly’s 132 floors and the entire structure would be powered by a combination of solar and wind power.

 

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In 1987 toy maker LJN they planned on turning vicious killers into kid-friendly squirt toys with these Freddy Krueger and Jason water guns. Freddy made it to the prototype stage, while only concept art for the Jason gun was produced. From the looks of the vendor catalog image above, it appears as if Freddy’s gun was supposed to shoot water from his mouth, while pushing down on Jason’s arms would unleash a torrent of water from the head of his trusty axe.

 

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Florida’s Disney World needed a roller coaster on par with California’s Matterhorn. Mount Fuji was planned to be that coaster, deep in the heart of Epcot’s Japan Pavillion. It was said that it was scrapped to avoid a conflict of interest with Kodak, one of the parks main advertising partners. Allegedly they viewed Mount Fuji as a permanent advertisement for their competitor, Fuji Film.


 

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Architect Joseph Urban’s rejected 1926 proposal for the Metropolitan Opera House (NYC)

 

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Imagine what the NYC waterfront would have been like if Samuel Friede’s gargantuan 1906 Coney Island Globe had made it past the cornerstone laying stage. Measuring 300 feet in diameter and 750 feet tall, the bulbous, truss-supported 11-story tower was to be topped with huge spotlights and would have contained a theater, roller-skating rink, dance hall, circus, palm garden, weather observatory, several restaurants and a roof garden.

 

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Proposed extensions to the White House in Washington DC, 1891-1901

 

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The complicated case of the Museum Tower and the adjacent Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas was at one point to be resolved by installing a 400-foot sun-responsive sculpture-design proposal by architecture firms REX and Front. The large Surya sculpture would have shielded Nasher Sculpture Center from the Museum Tower’s intense reflection by expanding its light-sensitive panels as flowers.

 

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Difficulties plagued the project from Day 1 and costs began to escalate. Fourth Grace was cancelled in 2004. (Liverpool)

 

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“We were supposed to have a new national library built by Jan Kaplicky in Prague. Never happened and the guy died.”

 

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Moving sidewalks probably sounded like a civilized solution to the increasingly congested New York City of the 19th century: to ease crowded streets, “moving sidewalks” or “moving platforms” would be built underground. The idea was first proposed in 1871. Widely debated in newspapers at the time, it went no where: Mayor Seth Low killed the project. But it popped back up again around 1910, this time as a network of moving sidewalks at a top speed of about 10 miles per hour that would replace the new subway system.


 

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The Dubai Towers Dubai was a four-tower complex to be built in the city of Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The developer, Sama Dubai, intended it to form the centerpiece of The Lagoons, a megaproject located on Dubai Creek which was to consist of seven islands. The towers would have between 57 to 94 stories, and although the heights of each are not known, it is believed the tallest would top 400 meters (1,310 ft) while two others would rise beyond 300 meters (980 ft). Due to the economic downturn in Dubai, the project was killed.

 

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In 2005 toy manufacturer NECA planned to release an action figure based on the remake of “The Ring”. The set was to feature a figure of Samara along with two different display bases: a TV set and a well, the two things that Samara can most often be found emerging from. The figure was going to come apart at the waist, allowing us to either display her in front of the well or split her in half and have her coming out of the TV. The hair was even going to be flexible, allowing those two different poses to really come to life. But NECA was unable to acquire the proper licensing to actually release the set.

 

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The Geyser Mountain attraction was originally intended to be placed in the Frontierland area of Disneyland. The storyline was that the guests would ride a drilling machine where they encounter a geyser. This would toss the riders up and down, Tower of Terror style.




 

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Vincent G. Raney’s 1945 design for a United Nations complex in San Francisco’s Twin Peaks neighborhood. San Francisco was a candidate for the U.N. Headquarters but lost out to New York.

 

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Frank Gehry’s new Guggenheim Museum (NYC)

 

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Milwaukee’s “Tourist Tower” was to be 875 feet tall, taller than any building in the world outside of New York City. A slender center core would be fitted seven circular “exhibition areas” with an external, iron latticework helping to support the weight of each floor. Inside the core, glass elevators would zip from the ground level to the rooftop observation deck in two minutes. Other exhibition levels would include a revolving beer garden, an artificial stream where guests could go trout fishing, a complete and working dairy farm, and a restaurant where food would be served to guests on trays as they sat in airline seats, facing out at the landscape – “to give those persons who have never flown in a plane an opportunity to sample airline service,” explained Rasche. Backers of the project estimated it would draw as many as 1 million people to Milwaukee every year.

 

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New York architect Eytan Kaufman’s Sky Bridge Hotel in Abu Dhabi was going to be a 264-room hotel suspended in a blimp-like structure over a bridge that connected the main island to Lulu Island. Financial pressures pushed this design into the trash can.

 

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In 1964 the radical architecture group Archigram created Walking City and imagined a future in which borders and boundaries are abandoned in favor of a nomadic lifestyle among groups of people worldwide. Inspired by NASA’s towering, mobile launch pads, hovercraft, and science fiction comics, Archigram envisioned buildings that travel on land and sea to meet up for parties.

 

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In 1758, Charles Ribard designed an elephant to grace to the Champs-Élysées in the spot where the Arc de Triomphe now stands. It consisted of three levels, to be built in the shape of an elephant, with entry via a spiral staircase in the underbelly. The building was to have a form of air conditioning, and furniture that folded into the walls. A fountain — or perhaps the plumbing — was to flow from the elephant’s trunk.

 

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Super Mario’s Wacky Words would have been a direct continuation of Super Mario World. It was slated for a release on Phillips’ CD-I system. Some heavy work was done on this game before development was shut down due to the CD-I not being able to bring in the money. Three prototype discs are said to be in circulation and the game itself managed to at least reach Alpha stage. As it is a pre-alpha, the prototype is rather limited; Super Mario can only walk both ways and jump, and no powerups exist. He cannot slide or swim, but it would appear that these abilities would have been implemented had development continued.

 

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The Fun Palace was one of architect Cedric Price’s most influential projects and inspired Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano’s early 1970s project, Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. Using an unenclosed steel structure, fully serviced by travelling gantry cranes the building comprised a ‘kit of parts’: pre-fabricated walls, platforms, floors, stairs, and ceiling modules that could be moved and assembled by the cranes. Virtually every part of the structure was variable. “Its form and structure, resembling a large shipyard in which enclosures such as theatres, cinemas, restaurants, workshops, rally areas, can be assembled, moved, re-arranged and scrapped continuously,” promised Price.


 

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Stanley Tigerman’s Instant City, 1965, proposed a city where prism-shaped offices sheltered grand expressways, leaving wide swatches of green space open to the public.


 

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Like a lot of people at the end of 2001 and beginning of 2002, artist/architect Vito Acconci made a hypothetical proposal for a building to replace the World Trade Center. His reasoning was that if buildings get exploded we could make them already exploded.

 

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In 2008, post-structuralist French architecture firm R&Sie(n) hoped to create a new research station and museum called Waterflux whose strange shape would have suggested ice caves – or the guts of a living thing.


 

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After Alcatraz was a prison and before it was a tourist attraction—Native Americans occupied the island in an effort to claim it as their own, in response to their own land being forcibly taken away by the government. Architect Donald MacDonald proposed this plan for the Alcatraz Center for Indian Life, which included a cultural center, school, museum, council chambers, and shops.


 

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Four Dutch designers—Chris Collaris, Ruben Esser, Sander Bakker and Patrick van der Gronde— envisioned a sustainable design of re-use for a discarded oil tanker as a city in the Southern Gulf Region, which they entitled The Black Gold.



 

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The Santa Monica Causeway

 

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In 1995, Peter Neville, an architect working for Japan’s Taisei Corporation, dreamed up the X-Seed 4000, a 2.5-mile high steel skyscraper in the shape of Mount Fuji that would have been situated in Tokyo. In fact, the X-Seed 4000 was designed to be slightly taller than Japan’s largest mountain. Neville’s futuristic environment could accommodate 500,000 to 1,000,000 inhabitants, who would zip around the 800-floor structure on MagLev trains. The X-Seed 4000 would have cost over $1 trillion to build.



 

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In the Mojave Desert you’ll find California City, a city famous for dreaming big. A huge chunk of it is gridded roads—complete with names, speed limits, and GPS driving directions—with nothing built on the vast majority of those plots. Incorporated in 1965, California City is a living contradiction. Today it’s a working community with roughly 15,000 residents. But it’s simultaneously enormous, having been planned at a scale to rival Los Angeles. The city has over 200 square miles of land.


 

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Though never released, The Car Game got close enough to production that print ads were in circulation. Based upon the relatively obscure 1977 movie The Car, in which a car) goes on a murderous rampage, the game looked as if it would actually be rather a lot of fun. Basically: position The Car at the top of the ramp, and – if it rolls down on your turn – you lose or win dependent on how much debris is knocked out of its path. That’s all well and good, but in the movie that debris was usually made out of living, breathing, people.

 

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Due to Robert Young’s untimely death, this re-imagination of Grand Central was never realized. The newly elected chairman of the New York Central Railroad chose architect I.M. Pei to design the new station, which was released in 1954. Pei’s “Hyperboloid” was a 1,497-foot-tall office tower and transit hub that would cost approximately $100 million and span 108 stories. The proposed nine-acre site would have been the the world’s tallest and most expensive structure. Young died in 1958 and the project was scrapped.

 

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In this never-built Disneyland attraction guests would have walked right into the mouth of an oversized version of the Crocodile from “Peter Pan.” Then — by walking down a set of steps (Which supposedly put Disneyland visitors down inside the croc’s belly!) — they could then peer out plate glass windows at a colorful collection of tropical fish.

 

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Atlantropa was the brainchild of the German architect Herman Sörgel, who tirelessly promoted his project from 1928 until his death in 1952. His experience of World War I, the economic and political turmoil of the 1920s and the rise of Nazism in Germany convinced Sörgel that a new world war could only be avoided if a radical solution was found to European problems of unemployment, overpopulation and, with Saudi oil still a decade away, an impending energy crisis. With little faith in politics, Sörgel turned to technology. Dams across the Strait of Gibraltar, the Dardanelles, and eventually between Sicily and Tunisia, each containing gigantic hydroelectric power plants, would form the basis for the new supercontinent. In its final state the Mediterranean would be converted into two basins, with the western part lowered by 100 meters and the eastern part by 200 meters and a total of 660,200 km2 of new land reclaimed from the sea – an area larger than France.



 

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Arakawa and Madeline Gins’ HOTEL REVERSIBLE DESTINY provides you with a meditative architectural context within which to demonstrate and explore your full range of capabilities, not only those generally accepted as part of the human repertoire but also still nascent ones. Through practicing architectural meditation within HOTEL REVERSIBLE DESTINY, visitors will come to know what makes a person tick, the ins and outs of human – and transhuman! – behavior. This architectural meditation site will before you know it have you “talking” for your great benefit with your own genes. HOTEL REVERSIBLE DESTINY makes you as adept at perspicuous bodily thinking as are birds in the sky and fish in the sea, but considerably more so.

 

 

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p.s. Hey. I have to speed along today because I start editing Zac’s and my really early, so my apologies for the rushing. ** Bernard, Hi, B. Great seeing and eating and blabbing with you! And amazing words re: Sypha’s post, thank you so much! See you soon! ** David Ehrenstein, Hi, and thank you for sharing your wisdom with Sypha. ** David Saä Estornell, Hi, David! I hope everything is really great with you. ** Marilyn Roxie, Hi Marilyn! Wonderful news about the success of the event! Yes, a link to the program would be most welcome, thank you. Exciting about the new Selected Ambient Twinks! If you upload it anywhere, please let me know. ** MyNeighbourJohnTurtorro, Hi. Thank you very much about the gig. Oh, mental stuff, okay, I’m so sorry. Take good care of yourself then, okay? And I will hope you can get to Paris. ** S., ‘Tis not, sir. Right, I have no religious stuff at all in my history, so it’s all exotica to me. Long hairs are the minions of something really special and indefinable. ** Matthew Doyle, Hi, Matthew! It’s very nice to see you! Great that you got to the ‘WWLTM’ event. I was jonesing to be there, not to read there, but to watch and listen. Plus, actually going to/checking out Poetic Research Bureau is a longtime dream. Richard Hawkins is a wonderful writer. I love his art, of course, but I do wish he wrote more often. That was a beautiful comment, kind of swoon-worthy. I’m excited to get the film finished and into the world. Thanks a lot, and take care. ** Liquoredgoat, Hi, D. So true. ** Jb, Thanks very much, jb, for your words to Sypha and for being here. ** New Juche, Hey there, Joe. It was obviously a real inspired thing on your part to suggest that post’s rebirth, thank you again. Correct, I have not seen those particular films. Did I do a post on ‘The Wild Boys’ before? Dang, I must have not remembered. I would have restored the old one if I had. I’ll have no problem finding worthy Parisian folks to whom I can gift those extra copies. Excellent day to you! ** Misanthrope, Hi. Good about ‘WW’ being good enough. Like I said, it’s a future plane-y for me. The only summer blockbuster I think I’ll actually go see in the theater is the new ‘Planet of the Apes’ one because I actually thought the last ‘PotA’ film was very good. ** Bill, Hi, Bill. Welcome to the continent. Even thinking about what SF->Berlin jet lag must be like makes me shudder. ** _Black_Acrylic, Hi, Ben. Thank you for the fine thoughts about Sypha’s post. ** Steevee, Hi. There’s a new Anthony Pateras album coming out at the beginning of July. No, he’s a lot more prolific than what iTunes is saying. He had four CDs come out in 2016 alone, for instance. iT just aren’t keeping up. Here’s his website. It has a discography and lots of playable recent tracks by him, etc. ** Sypha, Hey. You didn’t comment to me, not that you needed to, of course, but I do want to say thank you again so very much for the astounding Huysmans post. It obviously impressed everyone, and the traffic was this weekend was major. ** Okay. Apologies again for my hurtling today. I like unbuilt things, and up there are a number of them. See you tomorrow.

13 Comments

  1. Good morning, Dennis, Sypha, and Misa-

    So much to say, and I’ve got to get some sleep after a jam-packed full weekend in Ft. Lauderdale. Dennis, it was very enjoyable, thanks, but for important things like Crowley’s Gnostic Mass, which was phenomenal, and James, not a Black Mass at all. James, it would take pages for me to respond to your very impressive post, but I can’t do that now. Congrats on such an accomplishment. What I want to say here is: I saw in the art house movie theatre in Ft. Lauderdale – the film Manifesto, in which Cate Blanchet plays MANY roles…I would think anyone from this blog would by highly interested in this film…not sure if it’s been discussed here, but explores the subject of ART in highly unconventional/avant-garde ways…I loved it, and afterwords, right next door in the movie complex, saw Wonder Woman, George – just the end of it – what totally opposite movies playing right next to each other! I thought WW should receive the special effects rewards, but really, ended with a sentimentality that was not to be taken seriously. I’m a little incoherent at the moment after my late flight back, but seriously, everyone…see Manifesto…thought of you Dennis the whole time…a rare kind of experience to be shown in movie houses these days…she even quotes Godard in it at one point. Cate should receive next year’s Oscar, but I doubt that any of them will see this movie. Not a movie for the plane! I watched Disney’s Alladin coming back and really enjoyed it. Good night….

    • Kyler, Okay, you’ve got me really wanting to see Manifesto. I’m a bit Cate Blanchett fan too, btw. I agree on that WW ending.

  2. So much great stuff today, Dennis. Too good to have been built, obviously. That Apple phone! The Gothic LA project! All those urban farming projects! Whew.

    The jet lag is actually not bad, though (nor surprisingly) I have trouble staying awake at concerts. Maybe I’ll do better at the Axel Dorner gig tonight. Hope your editing is going smoothly…

    Bill

  3. Amphibiouspeter

    June 12, 2017 at 1:59 pm

    Hi DC,

    I always love these ones, thanks. In Glasgow’s Lighthouse (museum of architecture) they have a section which is maquettes of buildings which Charles Rennie Mackintosh applied to the city to build but lost the commission. I remember thinking that was pretty cool, the city could have ended up looking a whole lot more spacey.

    Also really enjoyed yesterday’s post, it’s always nice to see writers you like talking about writers they like. A few weeks ago I wanted to write an essay about that film A Serious Man by the Cohen Brothers. It’s one of the few films that Ive ended up reading around and felt that there were some gaps in what other people said about it. But then I thought like, where would I even put it? So I didn’t.

    Hope the editing goes well. I know you’ve said in the past that you’re interested in the editing process with your writing – is film editing proving equally fulfilling?

    Tc x

  4. Weird stuff today.
    I don’t like Frank Geary’s work at all.
    Give me the Sacgrida Famiglia

  5. I like the Angel City designs here… to say nothing of the Jabba the Hutt bean bag chair.

    Dennis, yeah, I wanted to leave behind a general comment for you thanking you for hosting the day again on the new blog, I just got so caught up replying to other people’s responses that it slipped my mind. Weirdly enough it almost seemed as if more people were engaging with it this second time around than they did the first time!

  6. what a great mass that was! lol trying lamb tartare soon. i dont really like longhairs. ive got one now totally cute blond. looking at my contacts im back on the blond ambition tour. learned theres a video of me fucking a twink in a bathroom last night. it looks produced lol im a star! im a new catholic old methodist. its a sick thing in its way. powerful magic. saw st paul in a berlin park recently freaky. i guess religion for me is im fucked its fucked dont give a fuck lifes a tiki bar

    used to be an altar boy father…

  7. I’ve doubtless mentioned him before but the writer Darran Anderson compiles many fascinating examples of unbuilt things on his Twitter feed and in his book Imaginary Cities. He lives not too far away from here and I saw him give a great talk at the DCA a few years back.

    My YNY colleague Alex was over earlier to watch Twin Peaks and damn, that new series is astonishingly great. Not that I want to go on about it but it’s shaping up to be Lynch’s zenith, is all I can say.

  8. Dennis, I want most of this stuff built. What the fuck is wrong with people not carrying through with their awesome ideas? Like, I always love these prototype cars at auto shows and then the companies put out such fucking bleh versions. Build it!

    Although the thought of buildings moving around to visit each other is bit creepy to me. 😛

    Hmm, I never really got into Planet of the Apes. But it’s definitely for lack of trying. Just something I didn’t get out to see. I should right that. You must like it for a reason, and I know others who like the new series.

    You like Arcade Fire at all? They just put out a new single, Everything Now, that I’ve really fallen for. Imagine Bowie and ABBA had a baby and it was a single. There’s this lyric that really kills me:

    Every inch of road’s got a town
    Daddy, how come you’re never around?
    I miss you, like everything now

    Of course, I do the really selfish thing and take it all out of context and make it apply to my missing my father…and well, I don’t know, I almost cried when I heard that. But then again, that’s my prerogative as a listener. 😀

    I really loved their album Neon Bible but wasn’t that big on their last two albums. However, I’m starting to give those two a bit of a listen and I’m kind of wishing I hadn’t written them off.

  9. I found Pateras’ Bandcamp site – he seems to have long since abandoned iTunes, which is idealistic but makes his music harder to find, at least for casual listeners – and downloaded his latest album, the one composed for a percussion ensemble. It reminded a lot of Xenakis. I signed up for his E-mail list, so I should be alerted for his July release. I believe he’s already released 2 albums in 2017, although he also seems to have long since abandoned the CD format.

  10. Would have liked to have seen the Japanese hive city built…who knows, maybe we still will?

    @kyler I saw manifesto at the Park Avenue Armory in New York and did enjoy it quite a bit. They showed it with all of the shorts playing side by side, not in a theatre. I’m curious how that would have changed the effectiveness of the piece.

    Editing is a lot of work but I’m glad to hear you’re deep in the thick of it. For my money there’s no better feeling (creatively speaking) than that. The head/heart are in an interesting place. I’m actually back in Arizona caring for my aging parents. Nothing long term yet, but getting them set up for the final phase of their life. I’m journaling a lot about the experience, which I’m hoping will usable someday for something. Creatively I’m working on finishing an interview that I conducted with dear friend/artist Marcus Scott Williams that we are hoping to get published. Also planning my Burning Man Village which is bringing me a lot of joy and giving me something to look forward to at the end of the summer. Have you read Infinite Jest? Truthfully I don’t know much of DFW’s work, though I really identify with his “This is Water” speech, but I had a number of friends suggest that I make it my summer reading. Thoughts?

    Thanks, as always, for asking and for, as always, being the wonderful person that you are.

    Bear

    • Hey Bear, just caught this – wow – they showed it with all of the parts playing around you? Very cool – Cate in every direction. She was recently on Stephen Colbert…I just like her a lot. It worked very well as a total piece I thought. She’s an amazing actress and the writer had a lot to say as well.

  11. Hey Dennis – Here’s Selected Ambient Twinks! https://vimeo.com/221113003 It’s kind of long-ish and better in the background, but would be super-curious what you think when you get a chance. I’ll let you know when the rest of the program with other folks’ videos is up too.

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