DC's

The blog of author Dennis Cooper

Author: DC (page 1 of 651)

Puke

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Millie Brown Vomits (2018)
‘Millie Brown’s artistic expression has gotten many audiences to question if it is really a form of art. An example of this would be on April 8th of 2011, where Millie Brown performed a piece within a company called SHOWstudio where she first showcased her art through a live studio video. The video is around five minutes long and contains Millie Brown drinking a series of 8 different artificially colored milks (ranging from different shades of colors such as yellow, purple, green and blue) and purposely throwing it up on a canvas. In the background of her performance are opera singers Patricia Hammond and Zita Syme singing a symphonic and soothing piece.’

 

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Jakub Julian Ziolkowski Sick of Love (2018)
‘Polish artist Jakub Julian Ziolkowski’s series Sick of Love sees the artist turning to ceramics in a bid to explore vases and vomit. Ziolkowski’s vases provide a “metaphoric receptacles for a cathartic purge” after the excesses of infatuation. Each is decorated with symbols of that physical anguish that accompanies failed relationships, evoking shamanistic and visceral themes.’

 

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Kristofer Paetau Art Forum Accident (2005)
‘I started to feel really bad at the opening of the Art Forum 2005 Art Fair in Berlin. And suddenly I couldn’t help myself, I had to vomit.’

 

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Johannes Kahrs Untitled (‘Nauseous Girl 1’) (2007)
‘The paintings of Johannes Kahrs are always based on photographs or film stills. For years already he has been collecting images from magazines, newspapers or films, and he himself sometimes also picks up a camera.’

 

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Jake & Dinos Chapman Like a dog returns to its vomit (2005)
‘With characteristic self-assurance and thoroughly post-modern irony, Jake and Dinos Chapman get their retaliation in first. ‘Like a Dog Returns to its Vomit’ appropriates a hostile, dismissive cliché, in the tradition of previous collections, ‘Insult to Injury’ and ‘The Rape of Creativity’. The indignant will find more to outrage their delicate sensibilities here. Even the arrangement of the etchings is designed to infuriate; stand back from the walls of the White Cube and one set suggests a dog defecating, the other a dog vomiting (or doing as the title of the show indicates).’

 

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OKEH x Mighty Jaxx Vomit Kid FastFood (2017)
‘In a red, yellow and white theme, Vomit Kid (Fast Food Red) reminds us of a familiar fast-food restaurant mascot. He is painted vanilla-milkshake-white with clown-like nose and lips, and chili-red hair to complete the look. Turn this bad boy around and you’ll find a smiley face imprinted on the back of his red t-shirt, reminding us of the happy mealtimes we had as kids at fast-food restaurants.’

 

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Arthur Simms Portrait of a Politician Vomiting (1992)
Rope, Paper, Wire, Charcoal, Pastel, Pen, Glue, Plastic, Metal, Glassine, Felt, Scre 1992ws, Wood, Burlap, Paint, Lucy Fradkin Drawing, 53 ½ x 55 x 22″

 

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assume vivid astro focus always vomit after formalities (2016)
‘A “uniform” performance that will dress viewers up to other performances on the same night. It is a sort of game with the initials of our pseudonym (a.v.a.f) – a process in our work that is very dada like – by following an inspiration idea by Tristan Tzara: collect different local newspapers from the week of our performance will be happening; then collect words from these newspapers with the a.v.a.f. initials; separate the words in different buckets (two buckets for A words, one for V words and one for F words). These avaf words will be assigned to each visitor and written on aprons given out to them. The audience will be wearing the avaf aprons the whole night long together with black oval masks.’

 

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Gilbert & George VOMIT (2014)
‘They’ve eaten at Mangal, a Turkish restaurant in Dalston, every evening for years on end. “We’re very loyal”, says George. They never look at the menu. “We order the same thing night after night until we’re nearly vomiting, and then we change.”’

 

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Peregrine Honig Pukers (2010)
‘The mixed media pieces depict vomiting individuals, their colorful ejections symbolizing the release of excesses acquired in a culture of consumption. Honig admits that she sometimes felt ill when making these works, and we can see in the spirited and sometimes chaotic pieces the emotional and physical force of the artist.’

 

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John Knuth Various (2013 – 2015)
‘An artist has created a disgusting collection of work by making more than 50,000 flies vomit on his canvases. The artwork is made by encouraging flies to throw-up sugar, water and watercolour paint. Artist John Knuth, 35, says he is taking advantage of flies’ digestive system to create the paintings – the largest of which measure up to 6ft tall and 4ft wide. Mr Knuth takes advantage of the fact flies cannot chew. Instead, before it can eat, the insect must first regurgitate a mixture of saliva and partly-digested material onto what it is about to consume. This liquidises the food, allowing the fly to suck it up, and leaving ‘flyspeck’ – a small splash of fly vomit. Mr Knuth’s method is to mix sugared water with watercolours to ensure the flies regurgitate sugary paint onto his canvasses.’

 

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Daniel Joseph Martinez We Are Dogs in Love with our Own Vomit (2006)
Animatronic sculpture, variable dimensions.

 

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Jon Pylypchuk You Live in a Pile of Vomit (2003)
sand paper, fabric, paint, glitter, fur, and pencil, on wove paper. approx. 10 x 8 1/2 in. (25.4 x 21.6 cm)

 

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Nathaniel Mellors The Vomiter (Ourhouse) (2010)
‘An animatronic head hooked up to an alimentary system of tubes and vomiting some nameless spume into a bucket. It never stops throwing up, as if permanently sick with itself.’

 

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Unknown Taino Manatee Bone Vomit Sticks (1000 to 1500 CE)
‘Taino spirituality, which focused on the spirit of the ancestors and the god of cassava, their primary crop, was mediated by a class of priests (bohiques), who often engaged in the taking of hallucinogenic drugs to aid in rituals and ceremonies. The Cohoba ritual required this type of special object, designed to induce vomiting to help a shaman purge themselves; this, coupled with fasting, allowed the shamans to have the most pure high from the Cohoba powder. Many of these vomiting sticks were made from the rib bones of West Indian Manatee.’

 

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William Hogarth Francis Matthew Schutz in His Bed (c.1755–1760)
‘Extensive analysis undertaken when the painting was acquired by Norwich Castle in 1990 revealed two sets of retouches, one dating from the first half of the nineteenth century and the other from the early twentieth century, with significant overpainting of the central area carried out around the mid-nineteenth century. Once the painting was cleaned and the overpainting removed, an astonishing detail was revealed, which transformed the whole meaning of the painting: Schutz was in fact depicted in the less dignified act of vomiting into a chamber pot, aching head resting on his hand. Moreover, a nineteenth-century label on the reverse of the painting tells us that this is no ordinary sickbed portrait: Schutz’s wife Susan, exasperated with her husband’s addiction ‘to the vice of intemperance’ and ‘under the hope of reforming him’, had commissioned Hogarth to paint him while suffering the after-effects of his debauchery.’

 

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Mike Parr Displacement Activities Part III vi The Emetics (Primary Vomit): I am Sick of Art [Red, Yellow and Blue] Blue (1977)
‘Parr has done more than 240 performances, some of which parodied 1970s minimalism, as when he pushed a line of tacks into his leg at precise intervals; others that parodied himself, as with 1977’s The Emetics (Primary Vomit); I Am Sick of Art [Red, Yellow and Blue], when Parr made himself vomit in primary colours. “I was exploring limit states,” he says. “I wanted to throw out all the crap and get back to the most basic impulses behind self-expression, and induce those sensations in the audience.”‘

 

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Alejandro Almanza Pereda Horror Vacui (2017)
‘Alejandro Almanza Pereda’s Horror Vacui (2010–17) series appropriates existing Romantic-style landscape and genre paintings sourced by the artist from within Istanbul. In the series, each painting is hung on the wall, with a lump of concrete stuck onto it, partially obscuring the image, as though part of a wall is hanging on the painting and not vice versa. Liquid concrete is then splattered on the painting and surrounding wall.’

 

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Emetophilia is a paraphilia in which an individual is sexually aroused by puking or observing others vomit. This is commonly referred to as a vomit fetish or puke fetish. Some emetophiles put their perversion of choice into practice by actually doing the technicolour yawn, often on a sexual partner.

‘Vomiting as a sex act is sometimes called a Roman shower, after the commonly held but mistaken belief that regurgitating food was an integral part of Roman feasts. In this urban myth ancient Romans are alleged to have thrown up after binge eating so that they could return to their feasts to eat more!

‘Some emetophiles find the act of chundering arousing; for them, the sequence of “spasm, ejaculation, relief” in retching is erotically charged. Other emetophiles are aroused by seeing, hearing, and/or smelling others heaving up their guts.

‘Some puke fetish enthusiasts desire a partner who will barf on them, while others wish to induce hurling in a partner, or even to force them to throw up. Wanting to be vomited on may be related to a desire to be dominated, while wanting to make someone else puke may stem from a desire to dominate the partner and it can be seen as a form of erotic humiliation. Emetophiles may have any combination of these desires at any time.’

 

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Cory Arcangel Vomit / Lakes (2015)
1920×1080 H.264/MPEG-4 Part 10 looped digital file (from 11 lossless TIF masters), media player, 70” flatscreen, armature, various cables

 

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Stuart Pearson Wright Various (2017-18)
‘Brian Sewell described Wright’s paintings as “images of such eccentricity and even madness that they fit perfectly the English tradition of the odd man out: the Blake, Spencer, Cecil Collins line, and the largest of them should at once have been bought by the Tate”. The Evening Standard called him “A Hogarth for our Times”.’


Halfboy Nauseous (2017)

 


Halfboy Vomiting in Debenhams (2108)

 

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Lisa Holzer I come in you (2018)
‘Food has to do with body, and desire, and destruction, and painting as well. What do I tell, the pictures me? Are they weak enough? Vulgar? I have difficulties with/at parties. I have difficulties with a certain way of happiness or lightness. What is the common ground thing? What do parties have to do with regression? It still seems wrong to me to work at parties. As teenager I cried a lot at parties. Emily Sundblad said: “But I think also people drink too much to really cause a revolution. They get too drunk, and they cannot do anything.”’

 

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Martin Creed Sick Film (2006)
Sick Film allows us to see the physical differences between men and women vomiting, but the process of the function is the same for each individual. Individuality is not lost and equality is gained. This equality may influence the spectators’ reactions as they connect the films to their intersubjective muscular memories and, perhaps awkwardly, find themselves in a public audience of individuals observing the films.’

 

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Beth Cavener In Bocca al Lupo (2012)
Stoneware, Mixed Media

 

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Gorillaz Sick Vomit Sticker (2016)
Perfect for phones, laptops, computers, or whatever needs a dose of originality.

 

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Barbora Kleinhamplová Sickness Report (2018)
‘The whole ship trembles in nausea and discomfort. Stillness can hardly be distinguished from vertigo and acceleration boosts motion sickness of both the crew and the very deck carrying the tortured bodies and minds. For those in pain, it doesn’t sound like a solution to just wait for the boat to fall apart and then start building a better one from scratch. It might take too much time. It might never even happen. Time might bring irreversible damages. The ocean might not be very accommodating. Still, they are the ones on board, while others are drowning. More and more prescriptions of diverse medications clearly aren’t capable of bringing structural change. The symptoms are reoccurring, copy-pasted, spread out on most of the ships sailing turbulent seas. Drowsiness, dizziness, discomfort, restiveness, repetitive yawning, malaise, nausea, pallor, sweating, headaches, fatigue, chest pains or tightness, palpitations, insomnia, apathy. Reducing symptoms has proven easier than searching for causes.’

 

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Elijah Burgher Liam vomiting ectoplasm (2011)
‘apart from the fact that it’s comforting to see that other people see ghosts and other unnamed 4th world entities (!!), our new motto: artloversnewyork short on funds, but never short on paranormal activity . . . !! it’s interesting to note his recent shift from magic realism (!!) to magic diagramming (!!) – completely in sync with a SATURN BLACK WATER DRAGON kick-ass start-off week. the dragon, a mythical beast – exists in the mind – remember ? plus it’s cool to see his literature background . . . where dragon myths loom large and colorful.’

 

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Armağan Kilci External | Throwing Up Series (20100
Acrylic on Colour Photograph 57×80 cm

 

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Bhakti Baxter Imploded Ball Barf (2011)
‘My father was a professional soccer player and later became a professional soccer coach. He traveled to Italy in 1990 as a photographer and literary journalist for a sports magazine. The photos were really good. I remember some shots he captured of Diego Maradona hitting on a super model and they were priceless. Soccer is ever present in the home of Argentinians. Screaming!!! Wild guttural screaming. Simultaneous emotional outbursts erupting from my dad and his friends. But let me be clear, when I made these I was not thinking about fútbol in any way. It was about tearing the old ball open, flipping it inside out (implosion), filling it with concrete, paint, resin, and letting it all meld together. I was thinking of the weight of stars. The scene in the movie Aliens where the eggs start to hatch.’

 

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Pretty Puke Various (2020)
‘Pretty Puke’s pictures are flesh caught in flashlight, strange bodily contortions and lewd acts frozen in the shocking brightness emitted with each shutter release – It’s LA at its seediest. But it’s in another space that the pictures have found their following. These images of debauchery have collided with the digital realm, and have been fast absorbed into internet culture. Pretty Puke has gained the attention of thousands of internet users, engrossed in what they see on the glow of their screens.’

 

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Brian Zimmerman Sketch for neon (2019)
Sculpy, plastic, paint 8″ x 2.5″ x 5.5″ tall

 

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Abel Azcona Utero (2014)
‘In the beginning of the piece, Azcona entered, nude, and began struggling with the coils of a thirty-foot length of coarse rope tied to an overhead beam. After writhing, biting, sucking and twisting with fury and abandon, Azcona tied the rope around his neck and ran through the crowd, to be jerked backwards with a horrible gargling cry, like a mad dog at the end of a short chain. There are many contexts in which young people, particularly young men, express themselves through personal endangerment: from suicide bombing to skateboarding. Where do you draw the line? Unlike many endurance actions, in which the level of danger builds slowly, allowing plenty of time for intervention, the potential of this particular action to turn suddenly, unintendedly fatal was too great. This time, he survived. After three harrowing runs, members of the crowd, feeling as I did, blocked his way, wrestling him to the ground and untying him, allowing him to crawl to a washtub of dirty water in the main gallery, where his wallowing, vomiting, and slithering came as a relief.’

 

 

*

p.s. Hey. ** Scunnard, Hi, Jared. Oh, good! ** h (now j), Hi. Yes, Tofu Mantra was a fave of mine. We’re having unseasonably cool, lovely weather here for as long as that lasts, and I’m enjoying it as much as I can before the inevitable heatwaves start striking. Crossroads in a great festival. The SF Cinematheque is amazing, and its maestro Steve Polta is a total hero. Stay undercover from your sun. ** David Ehrenstein, Ah, yes! ** John Christopher, Hi, John! I’m doing pretty okay, and how about you? Oh, great, the site/magazine is up! I’ll go visit and start regular visits as soon as I exit this p.s. Congrats! Everyone, John Christopher has a hot tip for us who are interested in being inspired and informed. John: ‘Remember I mentioned my class had a magazine coming out w/ Morrisroe stuff (& many other cool stuff) well it’s finally up & breathing! arcmagazine.org will be updated every Friday. I think the Morrisroe stuff will be up next week but not totally sure.’ Highly recommended that you use that link and bookmark the page for your ongoing pleasure. The name June Caldwell doesn’t ring an immediate bell, but I’ll start my acquaintanceship with the story you’re publishing. Great! You have a very fine weekend! ** _Black_Acrylic, Ha. Glad you liked it. Hope you like seeing it all come back up this weekend. Have an excellent coupla. ** Misanthrope, I think the baker still makes those baby cakes, and I think the baker is based in London, if I’m remembering right, so, next time you head over there, if US citizens are ever allowed to cross the Atlantic again, you can find out. I was always quite logical even as a little kid. Saved my mental health a bunch of times. July 4th is almost as overrated as New Year’s Eve. Well, enjoy the cook-out should that happen. I’ll be spending just another weekend over here. Our ‘July 4th’ is in a week or two. ** Bill, The chicken chair was definitely the source of much discomfit bordering on nightmares. Not sure if/how Bastille Day will be configured. I live near Concorde, and they’re building the big viewing stands there for the President and dignitaries to watch the big parade, so that seems normal. Otherwise, I think other than closed stores, etc., the only other big thing is the fireworks over the Eiffel Tower, and I’m pretty that’ll happen. ** chris dankland, Hi, Chris! Yeah, Ed Atkins’s stuff is pretty cool. Your aliens/food thought would make an extremely interesting movie. Maybe a better movie than a novel for some reason. Hm. A bit too plot and action oriented for Zac and me to tackle, otherwise … Not so evil, really, or, well, maybe evil. You tell me. And have an ultra-safe but fun-filled 4th of some sort, pal. ** Steve Erickson, Hi. Will do. Everyone, Mr. Erickson’s thoughts have weighed in on Ulrich Köhler’s film ‘Beginnings’, which is ‘ now available to stream in the US.’ I’ll check the Cinematheque’s site. I believe it reopens for actual, in-person film screenings in a week or something, gloriously. I’m not surprised that Damon Packard’s brain has gone that ridiculous route whatsoever. ** Corey Heiferman, Hey, Corey. Glad you liked all the stuff, natch. I … think those LACMA cakes were fund raising, auctioned off things? Hope you get to do that interview. Yeah, what a nice to be queried about. And of course the bear meets bear coincidence hits the spot with a sparkle. This weekend? Today there’s a tentative plan to look at art with Gisele, Zac, and our friend the film director Lucile Hadžihalilović, but I’m not sure if that’s happening. Tonight a powwow at Hard Rock Cafe with a Paris gallerist who wants to show my GIF work. The ICA in London is doing some kid of launch event about ‘Zac’s Drug Binge’, so I’ll coordinate with them. Uh, emails, enjoying the strangely wonderful cool temperature, This and that. You? ** Okay. Here’s the other half of the ‘Food’ post for you all to spend a portion of the next two days with. Strike your fancy, did it? See you on Monday.

Food

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Cynthia Delaney Suwito Knitting Noodles (2017)
‘Cynthia Delaney Suwito has always appreciated instant noodles as a quick and tasty meal. Now she’s turning them into a performance art piece. The Singapore-based, Indonesian fine arts graduate is knitting noodles at a Singapore gallery, creating a long edible scarf as part of the Untapped Discovery exhibition of emerging artists. ‘The 23-year-old spends three to four hours every day boiling, cooling and then knitting the noodle threads, adding 20-30cm to the length of the piece daily.’

 

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Ayako Fudamoto I can’t sit there (2016)
‘“I can’t sit there” is a mutated chicken sculpture made up of chicken dishes and apparently inspired by an urban legend of a four-legged chicken.’

 

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Dieter Roth Poeterei 3/4 (1968)
‘Swiss provocateur Dieter Roth printed his 1968 poetry journals on bags filled with sauerkraut, lamb or vanilla pudding (the last spiked with urine).’

 

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Andy Yoder Licorice Shoes (2003)
‘Yoder presents a giant pair of black wingtip shoes that mostly fill Plus Ultra’s limited space, turning the gallery into a sort of oversized shoebox. The odor in the space and the shiny surface of the shoes reveal that they are made of licorice. Yoder has clearly traveled far in his pursuit of black licorice. Included on the shoes’ extensive surfaces are licorice swirls, chunks, buttons, dogs and faux euros rimming the soles. Even the laces are made of licorice. The only place where there isn’t any licorice is inside the shoes, where the artist has used shellacked rice paper to perfectly imitate chic leather interiors. Despite their size, the shoes are remarkably lifelike, convincing from every angle.’

 

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Jamie Tan Cakes (2018)
‘In what might be a new standard for food artists everywhere, she’s sent her incredibly detailed cake sculptures down a completely different road: to be displayed in Los Angeles’ Museum of Contemporary Art, as one component of Argentinian sculptor Adrián Villar Rojas’ exhibition, Theatre of Disappearance. Tan made more than 70 cakes for the exhibition, a process that involved baking at least five cakes every day in the few months prior. Her works are edible but hardly look it. Instead, they emulate the textures and appearances of naturally occurring geographical formations – jagged rocks, molten lava and swirle marble.’

 

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Marcel Odenbach Seduction (2016)
‘The first thing I spot is a big pink painting with three enormous wafer biscuits. It is made by the German (video) artist Marcel Odenbach. Once you start approaching the work however, the wafers disappear, and an endless number of photographs start to show, all of them arranged by colour scheme to form the two different layers, the wafer and the chocolate and hazelnut filling. The big pink background then transforms into pages and pages of books in German. According to the gallery, all these elements together form an ode to the city of Vienna, the wafers as a symbol of the city and the collage of photographs with portraits of famous people as a symbol of the Austrian scientific and cultural world. Among them you can see the neurologist Sigmund Freund or the poet Ingeborg Bachman just to name a few.’

 

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Yosuke Amemiya Apple (2020)
‘Through the ages, I have been associated with immortality, temptation and love. Today, I am all but the humble fruit, a snack. My creator, Yosuke Amemiya, challenged my sweet origins and if you look a little closer, my hyper-realness is brought to life with the help of fibre-reinforced plastic, sculpted, formed, and hand-painted into the juicy, delectable, oddly-fascinating shape that I am. My curious appearance is a question of what is fact or fiction, a riddle. If you hold me – I will surely melt away. If you touch me – my softness will break away. Only with the heart, in total silence – you will find the answer.’

 

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Nayland Blake Gorge (1998)
Gorge (1998) is a video of the artist sitting shirtless being hand-fed an enormous amount of food for an hour by a shirtless black man from behind. In 2009, a live version of Gorge was staged in which audience members fed Blake.’

 

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Chloe Wise Pissing, Shmoozing, and Looking Away (2015)
‘The Canadian-born, New York-based artist Chloe Wise’s first solo show riffs on the luxury handbag trade by recreating purses by Chanel, Coach, Louis Vuitton, and Prada using toast, bagels, challah, and croissants.’

 

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Ed Atkins Old Food (2018)

 

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Maha Malluh Food For Thought – Al Muallaqat (2015)
‘Living and working in Saudi Arabia, artist Maha Malluh’s work centres upon the impact of globalisation and consumer culture within her nation. “My inspiration for art comes from my country, a land of contrasting images and ideas. Good art… forces you to pause, to contemplate and think harder about your surroundings.” Her sculptures are assemblages of objects found in junk shops and flea markets, their decrepit state speaking volumes of the culture that once valued but has now discarded them. Food for Thought – Al-Muallaqat is composed of aluminium cooking pots used traditionally throughout the Arab world. The title Al- Muallaqat links the installation to pre-Islamic 6th century Suspended Odes or Hanging Poems traditionally hung in Mecca.’

 

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Willie Coles Null (2012)
‘The work was produced by casting McDonalds hamburgers. The skull and crossbones depicted on the top of the burger is best understood when paired with the statement by Coles, “Because you know it’s shit, it lacks nutrition, is mostly fat, sugar and carbs. Because this represents the height of our civilisation, shit food made by people on shit pay that fucks your health. Do you want fries with that?”’

 

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Suzanne Anker Remote Sensing (2019)
‘Suzanne Anker is a visual artist and theorist working at the intersection of art and the biological sciences. Her practice investigates the ways in which nature is being altered in the 21st century. Concerned with genetics and toxic degradation, Anker frequently works with “pre-defined and found materials” botanical specimens, medical museum artifacts, laboratory apparatus, microscopic images and geological specimens. She works in a variety of mediums ranging from digital sculpture and installation to large-scale photography to plants grown by LED lights.’

 

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Martynka Wawrzyniak Chocolate (2017)
”Chocolate’ is a nine minute film in which the artist gets gradually covered in chocolate syrup, until she is left almost completely submerged.’

 

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Tom Friedman Untitled (Pizza) (2013)
Styrofoam and paint 86 x 86 x 5

 

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Wayne Thiebaud Various (1962-1963)

 

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Kader Attia Untitled (Ghardaïa) (2009)
‘French-Algerian artist Kader Attia’s 2009 scale model of the ancient fortified town Ghardaia in the Saharan M’zab Valley was constructed out of couscous that evoked sand. (Conservators were requested not to rebuild it if it crumbled.)’

 

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Charwei Tsai Tofu Mantra (2005)
Tofu Mantra marks the beginning of the Mantra Series where I wrote the Heart Sutra, which is a Buddhist scripture about the nature of impermanence and emptiness, from memory onto ephemeral objects. While the human flesh-like tofu is decaying, the text transforms through various stages of growth and decay as it materializes from thought.’

 

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James Ostrer Various (2010-2014)
‘Ostrer became fascinated with the idea of sugar as subject matter in 2009 when Kelloggs mascot, Tony the Tiger was banned from television advertising. As a committed confectionary enthusiast, Ostrer describes this work as his caveman paintings about his relationship to food. He explains, “Our ancestors would have had to be stung by a load of bees to get the taste of sweetness but all we have to do is grab something from the nearest shop.” As big business and powerful brands seduce us to consume more sticky unhealthy treats, the question begged, Wotsit all about? Ostrer set to work, planning his distorted sugar icons out of foodstuffs in every kind of convenience food, bought in bulk. Transporting the mass of products back to the studio, he organised the boxes of sweets, buns, crisps and pastries as a painter would a palette, adding dyes and artificial colouring to the cream cheese so that the messy creative process could begin. The models are positioned on a plinth and smeared with layers of lurid-coloured cream cheese and adorned with junk food.’

 

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Janine Antoni Gnaw (1992)
‘Two-part installation: 600 lbs. of chocolate gnawed by the artist; 600 lbs. of lard gnawed by the artist.’

 

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Bob Trotman Cake Lady (2002)

 

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Elizabeth Willing Lick (2018)
Lick showed a girl eating and licking a pane of sugar glass with an up-close focus on how her mouth moves while licking and eating the glass.’

 

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Tony Matelli Double Meat Head (2009)
‘Tony Matelli’s “Double Meat Head,” a self-portrait diptych, represents the two stages of Matelli’s existence — the first stage signified with live, fresh meat, the second stage signified with decay, in which the flesh decomposes, consumed by maggots.’

 

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Alonsa Guevara Various (2014-2017)
Oil on canvas, 8 inches diameter

 

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Zina Saro-Wiwa Barisuka Eats Roasted Ice Fish and Mu (2014)
‘”Table Manners” is a series of films made by video artist Zina Saro-Wiwa is a documentation of her local community in the Niger Delta. Each film has a central character and dish, the subjects face the camera while eating; the sound of their chewing and swallowing contrasts with the relative silence of the everyday task of surviving.’

 

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Oliver Herring Color Spit Quartet (2015)

 

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Meydan Levy Neo Fruit (2019)
‘Bezalel Academy of Art and Design graduate Meydan Levy has developed five edible artificial fruits, which comprise printed cellulose skins filled with a cocktail of vitamins and minerals. Called Neo Fruit, Levy’s fake fruit have soft cases that are 3D-printed from translucent cellulose – an organic compound that gives plants their structure. These skins are then injected with nutrient-rich liquids with various colours and flavours. Levy describes the process as 4D printing because, unlike traditional 3D printing, the final form of the fruit changes after it comes out of the printer. The cellulose skins are printed in a flat, compressed form, and only take on their final fruit-like appearance once the liquid is added. The final form of the fruit is determined by built-in arteries, or micro-tubes, in the 3D-printed structures, which fill up to give the fruit volume.’

 

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Simone Rachell Water Closet, Blow Dryer, Chair (2008)
‘Meat can embody many different meanings and every artist seems to exploit a personal perspective on the overall signification of such material. However I think that the softness and moist qualities of meat most readily suggest links to “the erotic”, but the smell of blood of mutilated corpses and guts may bring to very different realms.’

 

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Justin Favela Floor Nachos Supreme (2019)
‘Justin Favela has always seen nachos as work of art. “The endless combinations of ingredients, the textures, the history and the debate of the best and most original nachos make the dish a conversation piece and catalyst for conversations about belonging and authenticity,” he writes on the text panel for his piñata sculpture “Floor Nachos Supreme.”’

 

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Studio Wieki Somers & Rafael Mutter Chocolate Mill (2012)
‘For a major retrospective of Dutch furniture designer and architect Gerrit Rietveld, the team at Studio Wieki Somers collaborated with chocolatier Rafael Mutter to create Chocolate Mill. The piece was comprised of a giant cylindrical chocolate block that was carefully organized in 10 stacked layers, with flavored shapes used to create different geometric patterns. As a crank-turned blade similar to a cheese slicer grazed shavings off the top, the hidden layers were slowly revealed.’

 

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Greely Myatt Piece of Cake (2008)
Cypress and Acrylic 17.75″ x 6.5″ x 3.25″

 

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Caroline Brooks Various (1876-1882)
‘Caroline Brooks, an Arkansas housewife, was the unlikely artist who brought butter sculpture into the spotlight nearly 140 years ago. At the time, farmers’ wives were in charge of churning milk into butter, and often used wooden molds or stamps to shape the bricks. By sculpting the butter instead, Brooks took the practice one step further and turned it into a staple of so many fairs. At the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, Brooks crafted a butter portrait of a young woman called Dreaming Iolanthe and put it on display. According to Pamela Simpson’s book Corn Palaces and Butter Queen, the sculpture was “repeatedly praised as ‘the most beautiful and unique exhibit at the fair.'”‘

 

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Fernando Mastrangelo Medallion (2013)
‘They are handmade versions of ready-made decorative ceiling medallions meant to evoke the plaster Putti ornaments that surround chandelier escutcheons in traditional aristocratic and institutional decoration. Unlike the Home Depot or Lowe’s versions, each are individually made from resin, then carefully articulated with various crystalline materials (specifically commodities like sugar or candy). By hanging his medallions on the wall, instead of from a ceiling with lavish chandeliers descending from their cut-out centers, New York-based artist Fernando Mastrangelo clearly addresses commodification and decoration. These evoke the idea of paste-on history, of shelf commodities presented for inspection by prospective carry-trade buyers who (theoretically) prefer to see their ceiling decoration at eye level with the gaping center hole staring blankly back.’

 

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Carmen Argote Cotton-Candy Tumbleweeds (2012)
‘Tumbleweeds found on the unearth Selig zoo site roll down into the amusement park and become intertwined with the lingering presence of the park.’

 

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Alexandre Dubosc Freequences (2019)
‘Pavlovian short film optico-auricular. (Sculpture Cake or “Caketrope” filmed live on the theme of sound.)’

 

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Eduardo Navarro Into Ourselves (2018)
‘In his exhibit “Into Ourselves”, visitors will find dozens of pen-and-paper drawings spread out under heat lamps, and a large soup pot on a hot plate in one corner of the room. On the nights that Navarro holds a serving, he dissolves one or more drawings into the pot of soup and hands out individual cup servings to visitors. Navarro explains that these specific drawings, made using rice paper and edible sharpie, are actually based on concepts of quantum physics, such as the holographic principle. The majority of Navarro’s artwork is thematically designed to involve all of our senses, not just sight. He refers to the stomach as a kind of “internal eye” and elaborates on the idea of patrons being able to take away a part of the exhibit visit with them, absorbing the essence of the art into their bodies.’

 

 

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p.s. Hey. ** Conrad, Hi, Conrad. Thank you so much, and it’s really good to have you here. That is a very interesting question about Rhys and Nathalie Sarraute. I have no idea. I wonder if one could find out. You were at the Pompidou premiere of Patric’s film? I was there, well, if we’re talking about the same screening. I’m happy you like the film. Yes, I just saw that Le Clef is screening ‘Glitterbug’. I’m going to try to go if I can. Such a great place/project: Le Clef, no? Thanks again. Come back anytime. If we’re at the same event out there in Paris, say hey if you feel like it. ** h (now j), Hi. Yes, yes, she was/is really something. Ah, I know so well about interesting projects that don’t pay well. In fact I think those are the only projects I know. ** David Ehrenstein, Hi. Yes, she was a very special artist. I look forward to reading your piece! Everyone, Mr. Ehrenstein has written a very interesting sounding piece that you oughta read. David: ‘Here’s a piece I’ve written for Benjamin DeMott’s website “First of The Month”: “Keeping Up Appearances” It’s about Agent Orange and Erving Goffman.’ ** Bill, Hi, B. Yes, I hope Alan’s holding up. I haven’t interacted with him since the last time he popped in here unexpectedly a couple years ago. I saw that Cahun show. Yoshiharu Tsuge … hm, I don’t know. I’ll go search him out and see. And I’ll try to find ‘The Swamp’. There’s a pretty good store near me that specialises in manga. Thanks, pal. ** _Black_Acrylic, Oh, man, I went through that: the building I lived in being sold and having to vacate. Stressful. But I’m sure you’ll find something as good, and nice about the long fair warning at least. But … excellent about the show! And the regular spot to boot! That’s fantastic news! I’m assuming I/we will be able to tune in? Keep me informed. Great, Ben! ** Misanthrope, Yes, it’s the same Alan. Same with me: not a peep. Logic is my saviour. I used to swear by Oscillococcinum. It was always kind of a miracle thing for me. But I haven’t sought it out over here. Right, it’s July 4th almost. I forgot. Well, enjoy the weekend, and, yeah, keep your distances. ** Steve Erickson, Ira Robbins, right. That’s cool news. I was a dedicated Trouser Press reader back in the day. Hope that works out, obviously. Seems like it will. Why wouldn’t it, I guess? I thought the early Araki was interesting, uneven but promising. But then he decided to make snark his thing, and his scripts became intolerable (to me), but he found his thing, and he has his big fans, that’s for sure. And James Duval is always wonderful in the films if nothing else. No, the COVID-related visual art so far is very obvious and didactic, very Ai Wei Wei, who, of course, is already cranking out big ‘poetic’, ‘meaningful’ COVID-milking installation pieces. I’ve heard nothing about the NYFF this year, only what Nik wrote the other day. ** Okay. Today’s post has an ‘evil’ sibling post that will appear here tomorrow. That is all. Try to enjoy. See you tomorrow.

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