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The blog of author Dennis Cooper

18 needlessly obscured avant-garde films, selected by Terry Ratchett: Thomas White, Teinosuke Kinugasa, George Barry, Standish Lauder, Helge Schneider, Dušan Makavejev, Oliver Herrmann, Marco Ferreri, Mamoru Oshii, Gian Carlo Menotti, Pat O’Neill, Vera Chytilová, Shozin Fukui, Willard Maas, Robert Downey Sr., Juraj Herz, Jay Schlossberg-Cohen *

* (restored)

 

Standish Lauder

 

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Thomas White Who’s Crazy (1966)
‘Accompanied by a frenetic original soundtrack by the great Ornette Coleman, insane asylum inmates escape their confinement and hole up in a deserted Belgian farmhouse, where they cook large quantities of eggs and condemn one of their own in an impromptu court. The actors don’t have much need for words when they can dance around, light things on fire, and drip hot wax on each other instead. Ornette Coleman and the other members of his trio – David Izenzon and Charles Moffett – recorded their score for WHO’S CRAZY? in one go while the film was projected for them, and the result feels like a bizarre silent film with the greatest possible accompaniment. The soundtrack also features a young Marianne Faithfull singing what are probably her most experimental riffs – written for her especially by Ornette – as she asks, “Is God man? Is man God?” in an original track titled “Sadness.” WHO’S CRAZY? was long thought to be lost by jazz-on-film scholars and the Library of Congress. In early 2015, the only surviving copy of the film, a 35mm print struck for the film’s debut at Cannes in 1966, was salvaged from director Thomas White’s garage after sitting on a shelf there for decades. Ornette’s soundtrack exists as a hard-to-find LP, but audiences have never before had the opportunity to see what Ornette saw when he composed it. The cast consists of actors from New York’s experimental theater troupe, the Living Theatre, who also performed in Shirley Clarke’s THE CONNECTION.— Grand Motel


Trailer

 

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Teinosuke Kinugasa A Page of Madness (1926)
‘Though the synopsis of the plot doesn’t really do justice to the movie — a retired sailor who works at an insane asylum to care after his wife who tried to kill their child — the visual audacity of Page is still startling today. The opening sequence rhythmically cuts between shots of a torrential downpour and gushing water before dissolving into a hallucinatorily odd scene of a young woman in a rhomboid headdress dancing in front of a massive spinning ball. The woman is, of course, an inmate at the asylum dressed in rags. As her dance becomes more and more frenzied, the film cuts faster and faster, using superimpositions, spinning cameras and just about every other trick in the book. While Kinugasa was clearly influenced by The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, which also visualizes the inner world of the insane, the movie is also reminiscent of the works of French avant-garde filmmakers like Abel Gance, Russian montage masters like Sergei Eisenstein and, in particular, the subjective camerawork of F. W. Murnau in Der Letzte Mann. Kinugasa incorporated all of these influences seamlessly, creating an exhilarating, disturbing and ultimately sad tour de force of filmmaking. The great Japanese film critic Akira Iwasaki called the movie “the first film-like film born in Japan.”’ — Open Culture


the entire film

 

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George Barry Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (1977)
‘In 1972, some guy named George Barry got a camera and some film. What happened was Death Bed: The Bed That Eats. An incredibly bizarre mix of horror, sexploitation, avant-garde technique and arthouse, Death Bed was shot in 1972 but a print wasn’t struck until 1977. It then disappeared. before being rediscovered in 2003 and released on DVD, it gained a cult following when bootlegs made from a rare UK VHS/Betamax copy of the film began circulating. Director George Barry reportedly forgot about the film before he came across said bootleg found on a horror movie forum.’ — collaged


Excerpt


Excerpt

 

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Standish Lauder Necrology (1969)
‘Lauder’s film is a continuous shot of the anonymous faces of evening commuters in New York’s Grand Central Station. The film was made with a stationary camera pointed at a down escalator, and then the film was run backward, creating an effect of expressionless faces rising towards the heavens. Legendary filmmaker Jonas Mekas remarked of Necrology, “It is one of the strongest and grimmest comments upon the contemporary society that cinema has produced.”’ — Andris Damburs


the entire film

 

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Helge Schneider 00 Schneider – Jagd auf Nihil Baxter (1994)
‘The funny clown Bratislav Metulskie is found dead in circus “Apollo”. The retired commissioner 00 Schneider is asked to assume control of the case. Schneider and his aged sidekick Korschgen investigate to find the murderer. Nihil Baxter, a passionate art collector who is a little nuts and does not cultivate social contacts at all. Commissioner Schneider investigates at the circus and pays Baxter a visit. Baxter makes up an alibi and claims that he was working on a painting when the murder took place. The Sidekick Korschgen finds out that the picture is an imitation. When Baxter tries to escape to Rio by plane after he stole a sculpture from the practice of Dr. Hasenbein 00 Schneider and his sidekick are also on board. As they are incognito they are able to arrest the criminal with the help of the world famous “sniffer dog nose” pilot.’ — collaged


Trailer


Excerpt

 

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Dušan Makavejev Innocence Unprotected (1968)
‘“Narrative structure is prison; it is tradition; it is a lie; it is a formula that is imposed,” Dušan Makavejev once said. The Serbian filmmaker, who rose to cinematic fame or infamy (depending on who you ask) in Communist Yugoslavia in the sixties and early seventies, believed in breaking all the rules. Through collage and juxtaposition, Buñuelian absurdity and sexual confrontation, Makavejev freed narrative cinema from all oppressive norms. This utterly unclassifiable film is one of Makavejev’s most freewheeling farces, assembled from the “lost” footage of the first Serbian talkie, a silly melodrama titled Innocence Unprotected, made during the Nazi occupation; contemporary interviews with the megaman who made it and other crew members; and images of the World War II destruction, and subsequent rebuilding, of Belgrade. And at its center is a (real-life) character you won’t soon forget: Dragoljub Aleksic, an acrobat, locksmith, and Houdini-style escape artist whom Makavejev uses as the absurd and wondrous basis for a look back at his country’s tumultuous recent history.’ — The Criterion Collection


Excerpt

 

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Oliver Herrmann One Night, One Life (1999)
‘Oliver Herrmann was quickly proving to be an artist of provocative potential after creating the innovative short films Dichterlieb (2000), One Night, One Life (2002), and Le Sacre du Printemps (released 2004). Tragically, Herrmann’s life and career were cut short when he died of a diabetic stroke at the age of 40 in 2003. Herrman’s film of Arnold Shoenberg’s “Pierrot Lunaire,” is conducted by modern music specialist Pierre Boulez and starring Schäfer. A bit of history may be needed for Schoenberg’s atonal, expressionist melodrama. Set to Albert Giraud’s text, the poems, usually spoken by a soprano, are delivered in “Sprechgesang” (spoken singing). Upon its 1912 premiere, “Pierrot Lunaire” predictably offended the traditionalists. Much publicity was made about it, mostly bad, but at least this was a period when new music and new composers actually grabbed headlines. As late as the 1970s, conservative NY Times music critic Harold C. Schonberg claimed that “Pierrot Lunaire”‘s’ failure to enter the standard repertoire was an indictment of contemporary music. Yet, the 21st century has (somewhat) rendered Schonberg’s assessment as premature. If not quite part of the daily repertoire diet, “Lunaire” is extensively recorded and performed. One might envision it someday becoming as commonplace as Beethoven. However, together, Herrmann, Boulez, and Schäfer produce a commendable effort to rectify its potentially harmful respectability. The proof is in the pudding as far as music forum reviews go, with the hopelessly puritan music fans expressing outrage towards Herrmann’s blasphemous filming of music that was labeled blasphemous in 1912.’ — Alfred Eaker, 366 Weird Movies


the entire film

 

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Marco Ferreri Dillinger Is Dead (1969)
‘In this magnificently inscrutable late-sixties masterpiece, Marco Ferreri, one of European cinema’s most idiosyncratic auteurs, takes us through the looking glass to one seemingly routine night in the life of an Italian gas mask designer, played, in a tour de force performance, by New Wave icon Michel Piccoli. In his claustrophobic mod home, he pampers his pill-popping wife, seduces his maid, and uncovers a gun that may have once been owned by John Dillinger—and then things get even stranger. A surreal political missive about social malaise, Dillinger Is Dead (Dillinger è morto) finds absurdity in the mundane. It is a singular experience, both illogical and grandly existential.’ — The Criterion Collection


Trailer


Excerpt

 

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Mamoru Oshii Angel’s Egg (1985)
‘When people talk about something as having multiple interpretations, there’s almost always one “master” interpretation of the material that bubbles to the top and gets stuck there. The more movies and shows I watch, even those not designed to be an open-ended viewing experience, the more I feel it’s best to leave all such theories out of the picture until you’ve formed an outlook of your own. A movie should be a viewing experience first and a theory-forming exercise second, doubly so if the first viewing yields up not a storyline or even a theory, but a mood. Mamoru Oshii’s Angel’s Egg is so heavily charged with meaning and symbolism, it practically dares you to make something of it. It seems foolish to write about the film without producing something akin to the I-think-this-means-that essays that swirled in the wake of Stanley Kubrick’s equally enigmatic 2001: a space odyssey. Surely the whole point of talking about a movie this heavily symbolic is to talk symbolism, right?’ — Ganriki


the entire film

 

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Gian Carlo Menotti Help, Help, the Globolinks! (1969)
‘In this children’s opera, the world has been invaded by bizarre alien creatures named Globolinks, who are allergic to music. A bus full of children returning to boarding school breaks down in the middle of a lonely forest, and the students are surrounded by the alien creatures. Meanwhile, back at the school, the headmaster is infected by one of the aliens, meaning that he will soon turn into a Globolink himself. A children’s opera about music-loathing aliens is lready presumptively pretty weird. But when the opera is made in 1968, at the height of the psychedelic sixties, and utilizes all the camera tricks, distorted electronic noises, and bizarre set designs Summer of Love filmmakers developed in an attempt to mimic the disorienting effects of LSD, there’s no more need for the presumption–we’re definitely caught in a very weird nook of film.’ — G. Smalley, 366 Weird Movies


the entire film

 

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Pat O’Neill Water and Power (1989)
Water and Power is one of the most significant experimental films to come out of the 1980s, winning a Sundance Grand Jury Prize in1990 and being selected to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2008. Requiring almost a decade of work, the film is a true city symphony to the Los Angeles Basin. Like Roman Polanski’s Chinatown, the core focus of the film is the relationship of water, in all its forms, to the duplicitous undercurrents of this desert town. O’Neill implies a history of a frontier town, superimposing text and surrealist vignettes over wide vistas of the urban streets of LA and the landscape of Owens Valley, a main water source for the downtown area that is becoming increasingly sucked dry. The size and resolution of the 35mm film image provides a massive canvas for O’Neill’s incredibly precise optical printing work. The baselines for many of his compositions are time-lapsed landscapes, shot on a motion-control camera that allows precise movements to be duplicated in other locales. On top of these, O’Neill layers hi-contrast, ghostly figures performing surrealistic repetitive actions in a derelict downtown office, drawing historical and metaphoric parallels to the landscape being shown. The images are sutured together under the spell of George Lockwood’s beautiful sound design, layering snippets from B-movies, sound effects and a plethora of musical genres over the visual field.’ — aafimfest.org


Excerpt


Excerpt

 

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Věra Chytilová Les Petites Marguerites (1966)
‘The unconventional Les Petites Marguerites (aka “Daisies”) was the product of an unconventional filmmaker. A former philosophy and architecture student, Chytilová enrolled at FAMU in 1957, the only female in her class. There she discovered a love for improvisation, nonprofessional actors, and cinema verité—anything that rejected the idea of film as an exact science. Daisies incorporates all this and more in a wildly experimental narrative that is considered the movement’s singular feminist statement. Although Chytilová has denied that it was her intention to make a feminist film per se, it’s easy to see why decades of scholarship has made this assertion. The two teenage protagonists, Marie I and Marie II (Jitka Cerhová and Ivana Karbanová, neither of whom had any acting experience), refuse to play by the rules of the patriarchal culture around them, spending the film’s seventy-odd (very odd) minutes tearing up the world: exploiting weak-willed older men, consuming enormous amounts of food and drink, wreaking inebriated havoc, and finally descending into pure annihilation. In one of the film’s most famous sequences, they gleefully cut up a succession of phallic objects (bananas, sausages, bread rolls) with scissors. Chytilová ensures that something unexpected occurs in virtually every shot and edit, juxtaposing images with dissonant sounds, abruptly changing color filters within scenes, and fragmenting many sequences through unmotivated montage.’ — Michael Koresky


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Shozin Fukui 964 Pinocchio (1991)
‘Pinocchio 964 is a memory-wiped sex slave who is thrown out by his owners for failure to maintain an erection. It is unclear in what ways he has been modified beyond having no memory and being unable to communicate. He is discovered by Himiko while wandering aimlessly through the city. Himiko has also been memory-wiped, possibly by the same company that produced Pinocchio, but she is fully functional. Himiko spends her days drawing maps of the city, to aid other memory-wiped people. Himiko takes Pinocchio home and tries to teach him to speak. After much effort he has a breakthrough and finally becomes aware of his situation. At this point his body erupts in an inexplicable metamorphosis and it becomes clear that his modifications were much more involved and esoteric than simple memory loss. Himiko also begins to transform, though in a much more subtle manner.’ — letterboxd.com


Excerpts

 

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Willard Maas Geography Of The Body (1943)
‘Extreme close-ups of nude male and female bodies, taken through a magnifying glass bought at a dime store, are combined with a surrealist text written and read by poet George Barker. The poem, in Barker’s deadpan reading, comments humorously on the body parts, which are photographed in such tiny detail that they appear as landscapes. Geography of the Body was the first widely distributed underground art film, and was a regular fixture of the campus art film circuit for years. Although by the year 2000 it appears as a relatively quaint antique (and is in serious need of preservation assistance), Geography of the Body was easily as influential in its day as Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid’s Meshes of the Afternoon, made the same year.’ — Ubu


the entire film

 

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Robert Downey Sr. Greaser’s Palace (1972)
‘Nearly every event in Greaser’s Palace arrives unexpectedly and unannounced; there are few movies as totally unpredictable as this one. Jesus appears as a song-and-dance man, and has an agent. Characters get shot unexpectedly and repeatedly, and return from the dead with psychedelic stories about the afterlife. A midget and a transvestite live together in a prairie homestead as man and wife. A man tries to rape a wooden Indian. Mariachi music is used as an instrument of torture. The weirdness of this world is underplayed; none of the characters, with an important exception, acknowledge or even notice that anything is even the slightest bit off. This attitude makes some of the events come off even funnier, but it also makes the proposed comedy impure and tainted. Downey never signals to us whether he’s making a joke or not, and so we’re never sure whether we’re supposed to laugh or not. A town is assembled, quietly listening to a woman sing a song about the virtue of chastity. Suddenly, a man starts screaming in pain because a man dressed as a Halloween ghost burns him with a lit cigar. He is dragged by a gang of cowboys out into a dirt road and shot by his father for interrupting the festivities. Is this funny, or disturbing? Who can say? We don’t have a stock emotional response to that kind of scene; we have to make up our reaction on the fly.’ — G. Smalley, 366 Weird Movies


the entire film

 

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Juraj Herz The Cremator (1969)
‘In this mesmerizing, avant-garde Gothic horror film, a funerary specialist becomes obsessed with what he believes to be the nobility of his calling, with terrifyingly tragic and bizarre results. The production design is crisp and symmetrical. Stanislav Milota’s stunning black and white cinematography is haunting and beautiful. It features successions of extreme closeups that emphasize the slightly grotesque and disturbing features of the biological condition. Milota’s use of black and white film stock’s enhanced tonal range is artfully employed to focus attention on rich textures and multitudes of shades. This gives The Cremator a uniquely unsettling dreamlike quality. The musical score by Zdenek Liska is alluring, phantasmic, and aesthetically intriguing. Viewing The Cremator is akin to experiencing a nightmare that one is reluctant to wake from.’ — Pamela de Graff, 366 Weird Movies


the entire film

 

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Jean Rollin The Iron Rose (1973)
‘THE IRON ROSE is a haunting experience – a macabre tone poem about youth and age, love and nihilism, nostalgia and superstition, and, above all, life and death. Francoise Pascal (There’s a Girl in My Soup) and Hugues Quester (Three Colors: Blue) go on a metaphysical, Orpheus-like journey inside an ancient, all-but-abandoned graveyard but, as night falls, they cannot find their way out. As Quester’s nihilism crumbles to impatience and terror, Pascal transfers her disappointed passion for him to the cemetery itself and becomes jubilantly (and dangerously) attuned to its dead. Pascal gives a remarkably intuitive performance, at times so spontaneous in spirit, one cannot imagine how parts of it were ever scripted. The cemetery itself is analogous to Rollin’s love for all things antiquarian, including the old train station and the nearly moribund city of Amiens. If Orson Welles was correct when he estimated that a film could only be considered good to the extent it represented the artist who made it, THE IRON ROSE is Jean Rollin’s first authentic masterpiece.’ — Tim Lucas


Trailer


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Jay Schlossberg-Cohen Night Train to Terror (1985)
‘God and Satan are riding on a train at midnight. Looking out the window, they watch three stories, and debate the eternal fate of the protagonists. All the while, a teen pop/rock band is acting out a music video in a nearby compartment. Inspired by the box-office success of horror anthology movies like Creepshow (1982) and Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983), Night Train to Terror tries to hop a ride on the omnibus gravy train. Rather than shoot new stories specifically for this movie, however, the producers decided to save time and money by cutting unreleased full-length features they already owned the rights to into twenty-five minute segments. Needless to say, the results of this hacksaw editing, which consistently sacrifices narrative for nudity and gore scenes, are incoherent. The expository sequences with a hammy God (“I shed my mercy on them, as I do the gentle rain”) and hammier Satan (“there is no evil so vile which man will plunge himself into”) on a cosmic train judging the characters adds an additional layer of bizarreness. But, it’s the upbeat teen New Wave band shooting a music video in the next train compartment that sends the movie off the tracks and plunging into a void of pure weirdness.’ — G. Smalley, 366 Weird Movies


the entire film

 

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p.s. Hey. Some years ago when this blog was situated on my old murdered blog host, a DC’s reader named Terry Ratchett wrote to me and asked if he could curate the post you see above this, and I said, Sure, for what I hope is quite obvious reasons, and, Terry, if you’re still out there, belated thanks very much to you again. ** Mikelmotorcycle, Mikel, you old/young dog! How sweet it is to see you, buddy! Thanks a lot about ‘PGL’. Well, yeah, awesomeness in your presence, and if you get the itch to come back, please let me know how you are in general and what’s going on when you do. ** Ferdinand, Hi. It was and is a stunner, man. More please. ** Steevee, Hey. Oh, well now I am a bit more curious about the film. Hm. I’m so happy you’re writing for the Voice again. Robert Beatty … I know a few of his record cover designs, but I don’t think I know his videos and shorts. How interesting. I’ll be very curious to read your piece on his work, and I’ll hold off investigating it on my own until I see what you think. A review! I’ll, of course, read it once I’m outta here. Everyone, Here’s Steevee: ‘Here’s my second review of the week, on Chinese director Wang Bing’s TA’ANG. To be honest, I think Wang is one of the giants of world cinema now, and I was excited to learn earlier this week that his new film, BITTER MONEY, just got acquired for American distribution, so it pained me to write such a negative review of this one.’ ** Dóra Grőber, Hi! Oh, my enormous pleasure on the incredibly deserved praise and enthusiasm! Okay, cool, whenever you’re ready to do the SCAB post, I’ll be ready to do my part. So excited for its birth! Well, I bought a replacement desk yesterday, and, honestly, it’s cooler than the old one, so it’s all for the best. The French election is a mess, but defeating Le Pen is absolutely crucial. Did the writing go well? I seem to be very gradually losing my daze. Strangest thing. My yesterday was still beset with its last dregs. Worked on stuff: blog, notes on the documentary proposal, emails, some work I need to do for the new Gisele Vienne dance piece, … Took a long walk. Bought that desk I mentioned. Not so much. No, we still haven’t heard about the editing start date. It’s getting annoying. I fear the no news might mean it’ll start next week, but whatever, I guess. And you, and today? How did you two get along? ** _Black_Acrylic, Morning (if it’s still morning), Ben! ** Kyler, Hi, Kyler. Nice to see you, mister. I hope your dad’s post-opp goes as well as humanly possible and that your cruise there involves crystal clear seeing and that the challenging day wasn’t too, too. How did everything go? ** David Ehrenstein, Hi. Gary is capable of being very kind as well as of kindness’s polar opposite. I’ve dealt with him … from both sides now, ha ha. Zac’s dad lives just north of San Francisco these days. His mom lives in southern France near Nice, which is where he is from originally. Yes, I’ve been wanting and planning a good trip home, and I’d hoped to do that between film shooting and editing, but the time was too tight, so I suspect it’ll have to wait until the fall unless we get a longer than expected break amidst our editing. My LA based friend John Tuite and I have talked about co-curating some kind of series of weird, alternative queer events timed with Gay Pride, and hopefully we will, but I’m beginning to doubt that I’ll actually get to be there for them. ** Postitbreakup, Thank you again so much, Josh! ** Misanthrope, Hi, George. Huh, interesting: the definition. So I wonder if that means the term bogeyman originated as a term for people who have an excessive amount of boogers? ** Right. Enjoy the films, I hope. Starting tomorrow, you will be getting all or almost all new posts again at least for a while. Yep. See you tomorrow.

10 Comments

  1. Well I know what I’ll be watching over the summer. Thanks Terry!

  2. Great stuff cited today. “Dillinger is Dead” is required viewing — as is all of Marco Ferreri.

    Likewise Daisies

    Here’s an interesting piece on Flaubert.

  3. DILLINGER IS DEAD is almost a macho precursor to JEANNE DIELMAN.

    Over the next two weeks, I’m really going to dip into the world of Beatty’s videos and shorts. You could classify much of it as neo-psychedelia, but he’s also influenced by early video art and Polish animation. Anyway, my article on him should come out the week of May 26th.

    I’m trying to mitigate the side effects of my new medication by taking it later and with food. (This is my doctor’s suggestion.) Last night, I think I took it too late and it didn’t take effect till about 2 AM, which was not very helpful. Tonight, I’m going to take it around 7:30 – it takes about 4 hours to kick in, so hopefully I’ll reap the benefits while I’m still awake and before going to bed. I don’t know how this will work out in the long term, when I may be out and about in the evening.

  4. Cool… our site is the original source for several of the blurbs here. Besides the two credited to 366 Weird Movies (“One Night,One Life” was written by Alfred Eaker, “Greaser’s Palace” by G. Smalley), G. Smalley is also responsible for the quotes for “Help, Help, the Globolinks!” and “Night Train to Terror.” Pamela de Graff wrote the selection quoted for “The Cremator.” I suspect the cites were somehow lost when the article was transferred from one blog to another. We’ll also be reviewing some others on this list later.

  5. Hey Dennis, thanks for asking how it went. I’m at the Clark NJ library – Dad back at rehab, getting rehabbed currently, and Mom doing crossword puzzles so I’m safe for a few hours. The morning torrential rain was nearly disastrous and I got a little lost in my home state! But all is fine now and fun to see your blog at this local library. Also good to see my own website here, as it was being redirected for weeks to a Japanese Ray Band site – but was just fixed. (I know how fond you are of Google, heheh) So Dad got his stitches, uh, staples, out – and no major fights yet, knock wood – I could use a few avant-garde films at the moment, I’ll go back up and take a look. Still pouring outside…oh excellent doctor my Dad has – very kind, young and hot.

  6. Ooh is The Iron Rose any good? That one’s forthcoming on my DVD rental list.

    Had my 5th driving lesson today and it went well, which I’m very glad of as last week’s performance was decidedly sketchy. I’m always a lot happier after a successful run out.

    It was the 2017 UK Local Elections today and I’m sorry to say that my hood Dundee West voted in a Conservative councillor. Tories resurgent around Scotland in fact. Although UKIP did get pretty much destroyed in England, so I guess it’s not all been bad news.

  7. Postitbreakup – Enjoyed the BPDHAIKUS yesterday. Thanks for putting those together!

  8. Hey Dennis – I remember this post, but didn’t get to spend enough time with it. Glad to see it back so I can check out more of these films.

    Are you a fan of artists Peter Fischli and David Weiss? A friend has been raving about them recently and lent me a book from their recent Guggenheim retro.

    Been catching up with some recent-ish Werner Herzog docs and can recommend “Into the Inferno” if you haven’t seen it yet. Wonder why he seems to have kept his talent as a documentary filmmaker but lost it completely when it comes to fiction films? Seems like everything after “Cobra Verde” is a wash. Some of the later ones seem like they’re directed by someone entirely different than the person who did the 70s work. Or maybe I’m missing something?

  9. Dennis, Well, bogeyman -boogeyman to Americans- is a different animal. In my brief search about “booger,” I came across a lot of bogeyman stuff, even within discussions of booger/bogey. Let’s just say there is a lot of dispute as to where the term comes from or how it came about. I’d have to write a thesis to put forth all the explanations.

    Some think it’s from the “Bugbi” pirates in SE Asia that used to attack European ships. Others have it from older Middle English words that originally were used to described scarecrows. Very varied, these origins. But interesting nonetheless.

    I know you soured on SPDs a long time ago, but why not a bookshelf SPD? Couldn’t be anything controversial about that. Except maybe Sypha’s bookshelves which are full of perversion, illegality, and rot. Just an idea.

  10. I like the wide range of “avant-garde” implied by Terry’s choices.

    My experimentation with dosage and timing didn’t work out in my favor tonight. I feel just as tired as ever. I talked to my doctor in person about this stuff yesterday, but I would like to have another long conversation about it now. It’s frustrating to have so little control over your energy level – I think you once wrote something about sleep being essentially fascist.

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